Less is more – New York’s Armory Show 2018

March 15, 2018

2018 Armory Show presented itself with a clear layout and less galleries than within the last years and was therefore very pleasant to visit. Up from the welcoming and uncomplicated New Yorker handling of invitations for the specialist audience and collectors who arrived from all over the world, the whole setting of the fair was extremely well organized. The layout of the booths with in between enough space for sculptural works, a great light design, bright carpeting and centrally located bars and lounges were not only photogenic but made the visitor feel very comfortable.

Armory is – like Frieze and Art Basel – one of the most important sales fairs and does not claim an overall overview of all contemporary art trends. On the contrary it communicates an idea of the sophisticated “must haves” of the new season. Lots of excellent art works from the 50s to the 70s such as small Gerhard Richter pieces (each over 600.000 Dollars), Cy Twombly’s, a huge Nam Jun Paik installation at Gagosian and beautiful David Hockney’s made modern art collectors’ hearts beat faster.

However the curated parts such as Focus and Platform/The Contingent also exhibited relevant contemporary art pieces against a political background. Very spectacular was the mural of the well-known French urban artist JR – a huge photo work presented by the Armory Show, Artsy and Deitch Projects- So Close mounted at the Armory buildings’ façade facing Ellis Island – which 12 million immigrants and refugees had passed between 1892 and 1954. It shows a vision of immigrants in a line, created with templates of old photographic Archive material of The Ellis Island Museum of Immigration and recently by JR taken pictures of Syrian refugee camps.

Some of the curated booth designs we liked were the ones of Wetterling (Stockholm, among others showing works of Jim Dine, photo left), Marianne Boesky Gallery (New York, with works of Hannah van Bart and Hans Op de Beek) and Mizuma Art Gallery (Tokyo, showing works by Japanese – Australian duo Ken + Julia Yonetani photo above).

Another eye-catching position was Cry Havoc by young South African artist Mary Sibande (gallery MOMO from Johannesburg and Cape Town, photo left) addressing women’s power boiling over. Last but not least and a discovery at least from a European point of view in the Focus section were the notable powerful collages, textiles and prints of the 1938 in the U.S. born Afro-American artist Emma Amos (at Ryan Lee Gallery, New York), working on gender, racial and geographical perspectives.


Art Consulting

J.R. photo: Teddy Wolff, courtesy of The Armory Show

Other photos: courtesy of GoArt! Berlin

Berlin Food Festival: Interview with eat! berlin founder Bernhard Moser

February 27, 2018

In 2018 the Berlin food festival eat! berlin takes place for the seventh time. The annually edition is one of the culinary highlights of the capital involving 50 events with more than 60 chefs in the best restaurants adding up to 30 Michelin stars and 496 points in Gault&Millau. The luxury travel and lifestyle magazine Travelers’ World has honored the 2016 festival as one of the best 10 food festivals in the world. Tasty collaborations such as the Tipi at the Chancellery or Frau Luna and renowned chefs like Tim Raue or Sebastian Frank are among the highlights of eat! Berlin. Miriam Bers talked to the founder of the Berlin food festival, Bernhard Moser.

MB: What was your motivation to launch the Berlin food festival in 2011 and why eating?

BM: I come from a village in Austria. There were only two career options: agriculture or gastronomy. Since we did not have a farm, I became a cook/waiter, then went on to become a certified sommelier. So I gradually discovered the pleasure for me. The motivation to found the festival originates from the fact that I have always seen Berlin as a gourmet metropolis although back then it has often been perceived as a Currywurst stall. To me and many of my friends who are top chefs, this was really annoying. One evening we sat down together – including the owner of the Mattheis advertising agency and a well-known journalist – and came up with the idea of eat! Berlin.

MB: What are the selection criteria for participating in eat! berlin?

BM: I enjoy working with outstanding chefs and restaurateurs. Thereby I am guided by my own experiences at Gault&Millau. Ideally, the restaurant we work with has at least 15 points and stands for something. So no 08/15 restaurant but an outstanding position in the catering industry. Since we work very closely with the people during the festival, the personal relationship is also important – so it’s always good to recognize the egomaniacs in advance.

MB: Can we speak of culinary trends or food fashion?

BM: Yes, but we try to avoid it. Good food and drinks are our trend, but we are not interested in things like “superfood” and similar humbug.

MB: What role does sustainability play for chefs?

BM: For us, sustainability plays a significant role, for the chefs an increasing one. Ideally, the gourmet does not only enjoy, he also takes responsibility for his consumption. Regional food, e-mobility etc. are enormously important to us. In addition, we are the only gourmet festival in the world that is supplied exclusively with tap water.

MB: What are the Berlin food festival highlights this year, what’s new?

BM: Almost everything is new because I am not fund of repetitions. For me the development of the program is of high importance, so I cannot name any highlights. I am a fan of the entire program and look forward to every single event.

MB: How many visitors are you expecting this year and can you say that the Berlin food festival is attracting international audiences?

BM: We will have about 7,000 visitors this year, I don’t have exact numbers since some events are without rsvp such as the “Berliner Käsetage” (Berlin Cheese Days), so we can only estimate the number of visitors. Hence it could also be 9,000. Anyway, when I was there today, it was very busy.

Internationally, we have been receiving a lot of attention, especially since the nomination as one of the 10 best food festivals in the world. That’s good, because only in this way we change the image of our capital. We are not just a party city.

MB: What is your favorite place in Berlin?

BM: I cannot name my favorite gastronomy spot but apart from this my favorite place is on the couch watching cartoons with my daughter.

MB: Your longing place?

BM: I really want to visit Heston Blumenthal’s “The Fat Duck” in 2019.

MB: Do you cook privately?

BM: I am only allowed to cook when we have guests at home. Chefs cook differently, we need too many pots and always make a mess – that causes trouble.

MB: A recipe idea?

BM: Take a waxy boiled organic egg with a blob of sour cream and add Malossol caviar as much as you want. But please use caviar from good farms in your area. I appreciate the Brandenburg caviar from the trout and sturgeon farm Rottstock, operated by Susanne and Matthias Engels. Enjoyment often only needs three components.

Photos: courtesy of eat! Berlin

GoArt! Food Touren


Studio Visit with Working Title

February 2, 2018

Studio visit with Working Title

The designers of the brand-new label Working Title are still overwhelmed by its great success at this year’s Vogue Salon. For renowned designer Antonia Goy and her partner architect Björn Kubeja, who recently also became involved in stylistic affairs, founding the label was a logical consequence after 12 years of cooperation. Their collections, a mix of high-quality tailoring in the field of haute couture with avant-garde elements, applications, trains or prints, are thereby produced completely sustainably. Miriam Bers met the designers for an exclusive interview on behalf of a studio visit.


MB: How does your day start?
WT: Coffee!

MB: Why a mix of haute couture, avant-garde elements and Minimalism?
WT: Our work is significantly influenced by the artistic orientation of the art colleges we have studies at. Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, Bauhaus, art, culture and design history. From the Old Masters to the Modern Age, there is a variety of forms, colors, moods and concepts we pick elements from to develop our very own style. We both share the love for omitting, clear forms and exciting details: Antonia came in contact with the collections of Jil Sander in the press office Karla Otto. Björn is a huge fan of Rem Koolhaas, Tadao Ando and the Japanese architectural duo Sanaa.



MB: Your style summarized in three sentences..?
WT: Minimal down-to-earth luxury for modern self-confident women. Casualness and elegance in a cool contemporary mix. Completely free of polyester and made of sustainable honest materials!

MB: Which era inspires you the most (design, architecture, art)?
WT: Most of all we are inspired by Classical Modernism and the Renaissance. But basically we are open to everything because we are surrounded by so many inspiring things.

MB: Which was the last movie you have watched in the cinema?
WT: Suburbicon.

MB: How does your apartment look like, what kind of furniture do you prefer?
WT: Our apartment is rather modern and minimalist. A mélange of old and new, inherited and found pieces. A combination of objects we like, not following a particular style.

MB: What is your favorite place in Berlin?
WT: The path along the river Havel beneath the Grunewald tower.

MB: Your place of longing?
WT: The sea.

MB: How does your day end? Do you cook yourself or do you eat out?
WT: No matter when we come home, we cook something delicious – that’s part of our recreation.
MB: Recipe idea?
WT: Spaghetti Carbonara with courgette julienne instead of bacon. Boil the spaghetti al dente, chop the courgette and roast it gently in olive oil and garlic. Whisk eggs, cream, parmesan and fresh pepper and combine everything in a warmed ceramic bowl. Voilà!

Working Title

GoArt! studio visit